Trends

The Future of Work

Pioneering concepts for the working environment of the future: As never before, rapid change is affecting every aspect of our society, politics, economy and consequently also our working lives. As part of a large-scale study, Bene conducted interviews and discussions with more than 40 international experts in order to identify current trends, summarise them, and present an overview of their potential impact on working environments. The results of this research project have just been published by Bene as the Future of Work Report 2018, now available online at http://futureofwork.bene.com/.

Events

Presentation STUDIO by BENE

08. March 2018 | Bikini Berlin, 2. OG | Budapester Straße 38-50

You are cordially invited to the presentation of our new design line STUDIO by Bene at our showroom in Berlin.

Events

STUDIO by Bene Launch-Party

1st March 2018 | Seamen’s Hall at Somerset House, Strand London WC2R 1LA

The STUDIO Party presented by Bene & Dezeen for those who live and work by their own rules.

Events

How will you work in the future?

22nd March 2018 | Living Tomorrow | Indringingsweg 1, 1800 Vilvoorde, Belgium | Tel. +32-2-421 41 80 | OFFICE@BENE.COM

As a leading international designer and furnisher of modern office and working environments, our mission is to anticipate and understand changes that affect the future of work, in order to provide new and intelligent solutions for our customers as soon as possible.

STUDIO - Interview with the Designer Thomas Feichtner

Thomas Feichtner

Interview with THOMAS FEICHNTER.

With STUDIO, Thomas Feichtner has developed a modern, modular workplace system, designed to appeal particularly to people who live their individuality and creativity, even at work. We spoke to him about design in the workplace, creative currency and his childhood dream job.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO CREATE STUDIO?
Lots of my colleagues often put their own furniture together because they couldn’t find what they wanted on the conventional office furnishings market. That was my starting point. And then I just asked myself: “What furniture would I love to have in my own office?”

WHAT MARKS YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE, THE PEOPLE YOU DESIGNED STUDIO BY BENE FOR?
Creatives don’t see boundaries between work and private life, work and leisure. They’re not concerned with work-life-balance, just about “love your work”. And this group includes lots of design lovers who want to have beautiful things at home and in the office. So the dividing line between home and office is fluid. You want to feel at home.

Bene Spectrum: Colour Themes

Bene Spectrum: Brochures

A consistent and versatile colour and material system that is ideally suited for designing modern office worlds.

Trends

PIXEL BY BENE at the Milan furniture fair

PIXEL  Salone Internazionale del Mobile.Milano

The world's largest design fair took place between 4–9 April: the Salone Internazionale del Mobile in Milan. Major brands and up-and-coming international designers presented the trends of tomorrow. PIXEL by Bene obviously had to take part.

The Salone Internazionale del Mobile has been the centrepiece of the international scene every spring for 56 years now. Around 2,000 companies presented the latest design trends over approx. 200,000 m2 of exhibition space. More than 3,000 visitors came in search of inspiration this year. The six days also included around 1,300 different events. The Salone Ufficio takes place every two years as part of the Salone Internazionale. This year’s "International Biennial Workspace Exhibition", originally established in 1982, was devoted to the theme "Workplace 3.0". Around 120 exhibitors presented their solutions for the working environment over approx. 10,000 m2 of exhibition space.

Author: Bene

Interview with BOICUT: “Work feels quite different for me”

BOICUT inspired by PIXEL

The Austrian artist, BOICUT, lives and works in Vienna. His works are abstract, impulsive, colourful and quite brilliant. BOICUT has painted a special edition of PIXEL edition for Bene – with colours, shapes and lines that all somehow relate to ideas, office life and work.

How does anyone become an artist? Did you always want to paint, or was the path not quite so straightforward?
The path wasn’t quite that straight. There are some people who start drawing as kids and keep going. But it was a bit different for me; I drew a lot when I was young, but then other things got more important, like my first girlfriend and skateboarding. Then I studied in Vienna and worked in a call centre. It was only later that I studied graphic design. I wrote a dissertation about “The artist as a brand”, and that is also when I created BOICUT.

And where did it go from there?
At first I did small commissioned projects and worked at an agency. That often meant waking up at 5 in the morning, working on my own projects for a few hours and then heading into the agency. It was during this time that I had my first exhibition in London, then some work for Converse and, on my last day at the agency, I got a commission from Kaufhaus Steffl - the first big project under the name BOICUT.

What disruptive innovation means, and what businesses can do to encourage (or combat) it

PIXEL by Bene

There are some words that we have heard so often now that we don’t dare ask what they actually mean. “Disruption” is one such word. In our magazine, we’ve set out in search of the origin and meaning of this term that has caused such a stir in today’s worlds of finance and culture.

The theory of disruptive innovation has its origin in the book “The Innovator’s Dilemma” by Clayton Christensen. In his book Christensen suggests that, aside from the “classic” approach to innovation, which for example develops existing products and services, there exists also a disruptive form of innovation. This, according to Christensen, follows certain rules: one speaks of disruption if a small business with limited resources manages to displace established, hitherto successful businesses in a given industry.